Lea Marshes   Basketball project

 

In 2012 various botanical surveys of Lea Marshes were compared. To view this comparison table click this link.
The following document was released by ODA at a curious meeting (at a nursery on Riverside Close, Hackney, May 15, 2012) originally billed as joint with LVRPA, but LVRPA backed out when they found it was going to be recorded. A recording of the meeting is available at http://soundcloud.com/saveleytonmarsh/oda-meeting. The following is a pretty good version of the document. To download the original click this link oda-proposals-under-consideration-for-porters-field-reinstatement-15052012.pdf
It is interesting to compare this list with the Walthamstow plant list kept by LVRPA in 2002 and supplied to a person studying the marsh.
ODA's ecological survey of Porters Field   
ODA Proposals under consideration for Porters Field Reinstatement

A consultant is supporting the ODA in preparing a reinstatement plan for Porters Field. Once finalised this will be the basis of the ODA's application to LB Waltham Forest. The main points are in this excerpt.

1.0 EXISTING CONDITIONS

The most recent condition assessment of the ground conditions was undertaken in April 2012. The species found on the short mown turf and the rough uncut grassland were commonplace. Non unusual flora was noted within the scope of this survey. Species present (listed below) are typical of mesotrophic and amenity grassland areas in the region, suggesting the underlying soils are patchy, nutrient rich and immature. A simple turf maintenance programme is clearly in place which is likely to have involved a basic level of nutrient applications and mowing over the years.

The short mown turf has a sward height of between 25-50 mm at this time. The area was more species rich than the scrub grassland. Wildflower species made up an estimated 20% of the ground cover amongst the grasses. Routine public use has led to some evidence of localised compaction, eutrophication and wear, notable within the short turf areas. In the taller scrub grasslands litter was commonplace with the nutrient rich soils giving rise to a dominance of the coarse, more competitive grass species.

The number of wildflower species dropped noticeably in the areas of unmanaged grassland. A smaller number of grasses dominated, with occasional wildflower species dotted around, 1-5 plants per m2 id x 5% of the ground cover.

1.1 Short mown turf

Wildflowers Grass species
Abundant Abundant
DaisyBellis perennis  Rye GrassLolium perenne
Cat's Ear
Not present in 2002.
Hypochaeris radicata  Tall FescueFestuca arundinacea
White CloverTrifolium repens  Creeping Red FescueFestuca Rubra
Ribwort/ Narrow Leaved Plaintain
Not present in 2002.
Plantago lanceolata  Creeping BentgrassAgrostis stolonifera
YarrowAchillea millefolium  Browntop BentgrassAgrostis tenuis
Common: Few
DandelionTaraxacum officionale  Smooth stalked Meadow GrassPoa Pratensis
Hoary Plantain
Not present in 2002.
Plantago media  Annual Meadow GrassPoa Anua
Mouse Ear ChickweedCerastium spp.  Yorkshire FogHolcus lanatus
Common Hawkbit
Not present in 2002.
Leontodon hispidus 
Smooth Hawks BeardCrepis capillaris 
Dove's Food CranesbillGeranium molle 
Common ChamomileAnthemis nobilis 
Common ChickweedStellaris media 
Few: 
Wall SpeedwellVeronica arvensis 
ThistleCrisium sp. 
RagwortSenecio jacoboea 
Horn PlantainPlantago coronopus 
CinequifoilPotentilla reptons 

Unmanaged, scrub grassland

Wildflower Species  
Common: Abundant:
Common HogweedHeracleum sphondylium  CouchAgropyron repens
NettleUrtica Diolca  
Ribwort PlaintainPlantago Lanceolata  Tall FescueFestuca arundinacea
YarrowGalium aparine  Yorkshire FogHalcus lanatus
Few: CocksfootDactylis glomerata
HemlockConium maculatum  False OatgrassArrhenatherum elatius
Dove's-Foot CransesbillGeranium molle  Few:
ThistleCirsium sp.  Creeping Red FescueFestuca rubra
RagwortSenecio jacoboea  Rye GrassLalium perenne
Mouse-Ear ChickweedCerastium spp.  Creeping BentgrassAgrastis stolonifera
Common ChickweedStellaria media 
DandelionTaraxacum officinal 
Russian ComfreySymphytum officinale 
BrambleRubus Sp. 


2 Reinstatement Options

Reinstatement works form part of the contract with Nussli,the contractor for the temporary venue, however, within this, there are a number of options possible that the ODA are considering.


Option 1 - seeding

⊗ Undertake follow up botanical survey (June 2012)
⊗ Undertake levels survey
⊗ Develop and procure bespoke seed mix
⊗ Design topsoil amelioration programme
⊗ Prepare seedbed and drill-seed 16,000 m2 after building removed (early October)
⊗ Fence off area as walkers and dogs would lengthen reinstatement period
⊗ Irrigate and maintain to a full vigorous sward (Autumn 2012 through Spring 2013)
⊗ Re-instate damaged or weak areas (Autumn 2012 through Spring 2013)
⊗ Irrigate and maintain to a full and vigorous sward (Spring 2013)
⊗ Remove fencing and restore areas of turf affected by fenceline (May 2013)
⊗ Both the ODA and LVRPA have rejected this option as the time taken to open the marsh area for users is considered too long.


Option 2 - standard turf (20mm depth, 1m2 rolls)

⊗ Undertake follow up botanical survey (June 2012)
⊗ Undertake levels survey
⊗ Develop and procure bespoke grown turf
⊗ Design topsoil amelioration programme
⊗ Prepare seedbed
⊗ Cut, deliver and lay c. 16,0000 standard turf rolls after building removed (early October).
⊗ Fence off area as walkers and dogs would lengthen reinstatement period.
⊗ Irrigate and maintain (Autumn 2012 through Spring 2013)
⊗ Repair and re-turf damaged, desiccated or dead areas (Autumn 2012 through spring 2013)
⊗ Remove fencing and restore areas of turf affected by fenceline (May 2013)
⊗ Both the ODA and LVRPA have rejected this option as the time taken to open the marsh area for users is considered too long.


Option 3 - 'big roll' turf (30mm depth 75 m2 rolls)

⊗ Undertake follow up botanical survey (June 2012)
⊗ Undertake levels survey
⊗ Develop and procure bespoke grown turf
⊗ Design topsoil amelioration programme
⊗ Prepare seedbed
⊗ Cut, deliver and lay c. 220 large turf rolls after building removed (early October)
⊗ From 15th October 2012 users could access the area as this type of turf does not require a protect fence
⊗ Irrigate and maintain (October- November 2012).
⊗ This is the ODA and LVRPA's preferred option as it allows users back on the marsh in the shortest time. we are investigating this option further with suppliers.



In Options 2 and 3 following turf installation the Project Agronomist will determine the exact maintenance schedule based on weather and site conditions at the time.

Detail of OPTION 3: Restoration via thick cut, big roll turf (ODA investigating with suppliers)

Seed specification for intraseeding

The surface contractor must work with specialist seed suppliers to develop a bespoke grass and wildflower seed mix. Based on the following:

Grasses Wildflowers
Grasses Wildflowers: An even blend of:
Agrostis capillaris25%  Hypochaeris radicata
Festuca rubra25%  Trifolium repens
Poa pratensis25%  Plantago Lanceolata
Dactylis glomerata5%  Achillea millefolium
Festuca arundinacea10%  Plantago media
Lolium spp.10%  Cerastium spp
  Leontodon hispidus
  Crepis capillaris
  Geranium molle
  Anthemis nobilis



the above mixture may be subject to slight revision by the Project Ecologist. Allow for seed of native UK providence.